How we Make “Homemade” Medicine (Failsafers/Allergic/Intolerant etc)

Crushed antibiotic tablet mixed with water and CSR Golden Syrup

Crushed antibiotic tablet mixed with water and CSR Golden Syrup

So being the mum of two highly food intolerant girls has not only turned me into a magician cook (or ‘cooker’ as my daughter would say) in that I can cook ten different meals with the same five raw ingredients, but it has also turned me into an Apothecary Extraordinaire.

Just want to re-iterate my Medical Disclaimer here…this is what I do but you should get professional medical advice with regards to any matters of medication, health and wellbeing relating to yourself and  your kiddo’s :-)

Medicine for the Chemically Sensitive : My Way

Here is the first rule I learnt about giving medicine to my girls: Make it myself! All pediatric formulations contain flavours, preservatives and unless specificed, colours. All of these spell seriously bad, bad news for my girls. One option is to have a compounding pharmacist make up a preparation. You have to VERY specific if you get one of these and list exactly what can be allowed in. For various reasons I like to make up my kids medications myself and because we travel frequently its actually an imperative; a compounding Pharmacist fits neither in hand luggage nor  excess baggage!

The Steps…

1. First I get the doctor  or pharmacist (depending on whether it’s a prescription medication or not) to work out the required dose in mls by relating my daughters current weight in kg to the therapeutic dose of medication in mg.

2. Then I check the tablets myself in the pharmacy and choose the brand that doesn’t contain preservatives. For example, Panadol contains preservatives but Herron Paracetamol don’t. My youngest also reacts to some generic Amoxil and Clavulanic Acid antibiotics (behaviour disturbance) but not to the brand Augmentin. (See here for why I love Augmentin).

3. At home I crush the whole tablet with a crushing device (from a pharmacy) then add the specific mls of water. I add the minimum amount of water that I can get away with. For example if the dose is 1/3 tablet three times a day, I’ll add three mls of water only and withdraw one ml for each dose, for more complex dosing Pharmacist input can be really handy.

4. I mix that specific numbers of ‘mls’ with a blob of golden syrup. If I’ve managed to keep the amount of added water low, the syrup usually brings the syringe up to 5/6 mls which can be pushed into the mouth at one shot minimising the yucky taste (my girls hate having to have a ‘second’ shot at one sitting but sometimes it’s unavoidable).

Just a spoonful of Maple Syrup helps our medicine go down!

Just a spoonful of Maple Syrup helps our medicine go down!

5. I keep a jar of Maple Syrup and large spoon ready; in our house it is “A spoon full of maple syrup that helps the medicine go down” otherwise known as “Rum Punch” (Mary Poppin’s medicine of choice.)

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Categorised in: All Posts, Allergy Friendly Recipes, Food Allergy, Food Intolerance, Medication

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Naomi is…

a registered nurse who loves to write about Food Intolerance and Germs. Killing germs, avoiding germs, respecting the germ, and so, SO much more...

Medical Disclaimer: These pages are intended for entertainment purposes and if you're lucky, may sometimes be used as educational aids. However, the content herein should not replace the input from a qualified health care professional. If you think you are ill you should see a doctor.

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